Re-Disney: Final Report

And so it ends, just hours before our flight to Orlando:

Disney Animated Classics:

  1. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  2. Pinocchio
  3. Fantasia
  4. Dumbo
  5. Bambi
  6. Saludos Amigos
  7. The Three Caballeros
  8. Make Mine Music
  9. Fun and Fancy Free
  10. Melody Time
  11. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad
  12. Cinderella
  13. Alice in Wonderland
  14. Peter Pan
  15. Lady and the Tramp
  16. Sleeping Beauty
  17. One Hundred and One Dalmatians
  18. The Sword in the Stone
  19. The Jungle Book
  20. The Aristocats
  21. Robin Hood
  22. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  23. The Rescuers
  24. The Fox and the Hound
  25. The Black Cauldron
  26. The Great Mouse Detective
  27. Oliver & Company
  28. The Little Mermaid
  29. The Rescuers Down Under
  30. Beauty and the Beast
  31. Aladdin
  32. The Lion King
  33. Pocahontas
  34. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  35. Hercules
  36. Mulan
  37. Tarzan
  38. Fantasia 2000
  39. Dinosaur
  40. The Emperor’s New Groove
  41. Atlantis: The Lost Empire
  42. Lilo & Stitch
  43. Treasure Planet
  44. Brother Bear
  45. Home on the Range
  46. Chicken Little
  47. Meet the Robinsons
  48. Bolt
  49. The Princess and the Frog
  50. Tangled
  51. Winnie the Pooh
Pixar:
  1. Toy Story
  2. A Bug’s Life
  3. Toy Story 2
  4. Monsters, Inc.
  5. Finding Nemo
  6. The Incredibles
  7. Cars
  8. Ratatouille
  9. Wall-E
  10. Up
  11. Toy Story 3
  12. Cars 2
  13. Brave (for my review of Brave, check out this post)

Totals: 64 Completed, 0 Remaining

I saved my favorite four, the four that really have had a significant impact of life, for last. The Lion King, AladdinBeauty and the Beast, and, of course, The Little Mermaid.

There’s a whole bunch I can say about these films, like how The Little Mermaid is a great example of script economy–nothing here is wasted, save, perhaps, the “Les Poissons” number, which gets a pass since it’s such a crowd pleaser.  Or how Aladdin may be the most well-crafted of all Disney films.  Or how I find Moira Kelly just as annoying as the voice of adult Nala as I do her character from Season 1 of “The West Wing.”

BUT…I did want to take a second to give props to what makes these four films truly great, in a class all their own among the Disney animated canon:  they have the best villains! Think about it: Scar, Gaston, Jafar, and my personal favorite (who, like me, is modeled after Divine, world-famous drag queen), Ursula the Sea-Witch.

In all of these films, the viewer spends a not insignificant amount of time with the villains.  Their personalities are multifaceted.  You can kinda understand why Scar is a jealous weasel, and you get a kick out of Gaston being as much full of nauseating, humorous bravado as he is mean-spirited, “jerkface jock from gym class.”  You actually end up caring about them, in a twisted-beard sort of way.  How many other iconic Disney villains can you say that about?  Malificent is a wonder aesthetically, but her range is from “mean” to “really mean.” Cruella De Vil may be the only other Disney villain I can think of who is actually an interesting character.

I love these movies; they mean a lot to me, and I’m glad I took the time (4 whole days of my life–some 96 hours!) to revisit them.  I hope everybody at Blizzard Beach is ready for the fat behind I gained from my movie marathon immobility coming down Summet Plummet.

We’ll be Disney-bound in a few short hours!  For up-to-the-minute trip updates, follow us on Twitter!  We’ll have a trip report on the blog next week.

Book Review: The Disney Food Blog Guide to Walt Disney World Dining

Here’s an excerpt from the Disney World planning e-mail I sent Lance yesterday:

OKAY!

Here’s what I’ve compiled for our time at Disney.
Thursday, June 28th (EPCOT!)
Breakfast: Boardwalk Bakery (opens 6:30am)
Lunch: Sunshine Seasons (Future World) or Yorkshire County Fish Shop (UK pavilion)
Snack: Kringla Bakeri og Cafe (school bread, sweet pretzels; Norway pavilion) or Boulangerie Patisserie (France pavilion) or Karamell-Kuche (caramel corn, caramel corn cupcake; Germany pavilion) or Kabuki Cafe (kaki gori [shave ice]; Japan pavilion)
Dinner: La Hacienda de San Angel (reservation @ 8:15pm) or Via Napoli (reservation @ 6:20pm) or Les Chefs de France (reservation @ 5:00pm)
Other counter-service options (if we just can’t decide on something for dinner) include:
After dinner: Downtown Disney [walk back to Boardwalk Inn, transfer to bus (19 min)]
I decided we don’t need to do Fantasmic! (the night show) at Hollywood Studios since they do a version of it at Tokyo DisneySea, so we can just catch it then.
So, when did I become so anal retentive about our Disney World trip?
One of the most stressful aspects of Lance and I travelling together is that we are both terribly indecisive, which can lead to time and opportunity squandered as we can’t come up with what to do or where to eat.
Well, I wasn’t having any of that in Disney World.  I wanted the following three things set ahead of time:
  1. where we were going each day;
  2. what we were doing each day;
  3. and where we were going to eat.

Admittedly, I didn’t know much about Disney dining beyond the counter service pizza and hamburgers at places littered throughout the parks.  In the past, that was all I could afford and, honestly, I didn’t want to spend the time sitting down at a restaurant when I could be standing in line for the Country Bear Jamboree.

At some point in the Disney planning process, I stumbled upon the Disney Food Blog, a website, edited by AJ Wolfe, chock full of wonderful coverage, reviews, and PHOTOS! (blessed be the photos) of Disney dining.  I realized, after perusing DFB, that I could incorporate some finer dining into our trip to make it a more worthwhile experience, especially since we were staying at a Disney resort this trip and had more time to play with.

And, duh!, the biggest revelation for this Disney dining novice: I could also just find a character meal (i.e., a meal where characters like Mickey or Stepmother Tremaine from Cinderella [for real? who wants to see her?] show up and interact/take photos with the guests) and get all of my character photos out of the way in one fell-swoop as opposed to waiting in lines in the parks for hours, collectively. (We shoulda done this, Colleen, instead of waiting in Toon Town for an hour and then me calling you a bad name afterward out of frustration and exhaustion. The more you know..!)

The most comprehensive, one-stop-shop for all of DFB’s coverage is AJ’s The DFB Guide to Walt Disney World Dining 2012 e-book.  Not only is it updated annually, but as an e-book, it’s loaded with links to more extensive reviews and photo essays on their site, and is great to take with you to the parks on a smartphone (or, if you’re adventurous, a tablet).

A significant chunk of the book is dedicated to spelling out the different dining options (table-service, counter-service, character dining, signature dining, dining plans, advanced dining reservations, etc.) at Disney, the complexity of which can be labyrinthine, so I appreciated the straightforward layman explanations.

The book also comes with budgeting spreadsheets and sample dining itineraries which I found to be extremely helpful.  The list of recommended snack options (like the Norway pavilion’s school bread or the Dole Whip–how’d I never heard of this before??) has made it into our Disney vacay plan, as you can see above.

Lance will also be happy with the book’s comprehensive list of bars and lounges, which I’m sure he’ll need to utilize after one trip on It’s a Small World.

My one gripe with the book? Not enough pictures of the food!  I found myself going to the DFB site for more extensive photo coverage, or even Yelp and TripAdvisor.

The DFB as a whole is a great resource in maximizing your Disney vacation. The biggest downside is that it brings to your attention food and restaurants you probably wouldn’t have considered before, and suddenly you’ve made two dozen reservations for three meal times! (As seen above. Oops.)  My biggest disappointment about this trip already is how our discounted conference-rate room at the Boardwalk Inn doesn’t allow for the Disney Dining Plan to be added to it. Boo! Think about all I could’ve eaten then…

The DFB Guide to Walt Disney World Dining e-book comes in a bundle pack (which includes their main guide and separate, more extensive guides for Epcot and Magic Kingdom snacks) for $46.95, or you can buy the main guide separately for $18.95.

Highly recommended if you want to eat something different than hot dogs every day (but if you do, The DFB Guide covers where to find the best hot dogs! No joke), though I may be cursing its name after I’ve been to three buffets in one weekend.  Eep!

Disneyphiles! Where do you recommend to eat in the parks?

WanderLance and Jeff: No Compromise

(In retrospect, I guess I was asking for it.)

One of the more challenging parts of navigating the shared life of a relationship is when there is a disagreement over vacations.  Do you like “sit around and do nothing” vacations? Or do you like “immerse yourself in local culture by touring the food market” vacations? How do you come to some of agreement that isn’t really just a half-assed compromise that leaves both sides miserable?

The first time I realized that Lance and I don’t see eye-to-eye on vacations was when we went to Las Vegas for the first time.

“Oooh, ooh, I can’t wait to see the Hoover Dam!” I squealed. “And maybe maybe we can take a bus tour to the Grand Canyon!!!”

Lance got that look on his face, and shut it down. “Betch, please. I’m going to the pool.”

Y’see, Lance just doesn’t like what he calls “busy” vacations.  He likes to get his pina colada slushee in a giant plastic mug and lay out in the sun for hours at a time.  There will be no “touring,” for heaven’s sake.

I begrudgingly agreed to tag along to the pool, not wanting to force Lance to do anything he didn’t care to do, and surprise!, we didn’t make it to the Hoover Dam on that trip.

The following year, we were in Hawaii, a trip I never thought I’d make. I mean, I had to go to Pearl Harbor, right? How many more opportunities would I ever have to see it?

Our conversation about visiting the hallowed ground where thousands died in service to our country went a lil’ something like this:

Lance had absolutely negative desire to spend 45 minutes on the bus (each way) to look at some rusty metal and oil slicks.  The “do lots of stuff” vacations never appeal to him, which boggles my mind, since those were the only kind of vacations I did growing up.  You’ve got seven days to pack in as much stuff as possible….annnnd, go!

Unlike the Hoover Dam, though, I knew I couldn’t go to Oahu and not see Pearl Harbor.  That just wasn’t going to happen, regardless of whether or not Lance wanted to come with me.

We actually had a pretty serious conversation about how it’s okay to do things separately on vacation, even if you’re on the other side of the world.  It was a strange discussion to have, since, you know, we are in a relationship (now marriage) and we should do everything together, especially on a trip, right? Well, no. We decided that neither of us would try to restrict what the other wanted to do; if we were uninterested, we would just go do something else.

This works well, too, with how we decide vacation destinations.  There’s no compromises in this department: Lance gets to choose a big vacation one year, then I do the next, and so on.  That’s why we’ve been to Hawaii twice (my choice once, and then Lance’s).  That’s why we’re going to Japan this fall (my choice), and probably Hawaii again next year (Lance’s choice; notice a trend?).  While we’re on these trips, we can decide to do things together or individually, whatever each person wants to do.  This set-up more often than not keeps the peace!

With Disney World (my choice, though this gets into the whole vacation sub-category of “long weekend” trips which we tend not to count in our decision rotation), Lance confirmed my fears that he is happy to go, just not that OMIGODM-I-C-K-E-Y-M-O-U-S-EMICKEYMOUSE! excited as I am. (The interaction captured in the first cartoon was said without thinking, during an argument about dog boarding, of all things.)  At first, I was, yeah, a little sad and kind of hurt, but I had to remind myself that he has a right to his opinion; hell, it’s not like I’ve kept secret my lack of enthusiasm toward Las Vegas, one of Lance’s favorite places.

If Lance doesn’t want to do something in Disney World, we have that understanding that says, “Okay, well, you can go do whatever you want while I do this.”  Nobody should be kept back from doing what they want to do.  If I want to ride Peter Pan’s Flight, nothing’s gonna stop me, gosh darnit!

…Though, now that I think about it, I’ve still never made it to the Hoover Dam.

Hrmph.

Flick-fil-A: Brave

The first twenty minutes or so of Brave will make you think, “Oh, hey, this is a lot like Finding Nemo, but with a mom/daughter relationship.”  But Brave is, surprisingly, a lot more like Cars.

[Minor thematic spoilers below]

Both films have a Big Message (what usually sets apart Pixar films from, well, nearly every other animation house out there), and both miss graceful executions of said Big Message. Cars meanders too much–which I get is sort of the point, but c’mon, at least make it interesting–while Brave takes its main message and beats you over the head with it.  Brave is not subtle, even using voiceover narration (did the Brave screenwriters ever see Adaptation?!) to explain everything, including how being “brave” doesn’t always have to mean an outward display of courage.

Like the original CarsBrave is a solid B/B-minus and is frustrating because there’s potential there for it to be really good.  The score and songs are really solid, and the animation is simply breathtaking, with a level of detail and depth never before seen in a CGI film; I kept on thinking to myself, “Wow, I wonder what Walt Disney would’ve thought about this?” (this has something to do with Pixar’s brand new animation system, PRESTO).  This film is sure to become a standard in many Blu-ray players.  The themes are adequately addressed, if cumbersomely, but the humor is broad without being particularly clever, which Pixar has excelled with in the past.  The screenplay is just a lot rougher than anything the studio has produced before; perhaps this has something to do with its original director and creative force behind the film being fired midway through production.

[Sidebar: As discussed in this Comics Beat piece on it’s an odd year when it seems like there’s been a role-reversal between Disney Animation Studios and Pixar.  As the competition in the CGI animated field heats up and films from rivalstudios get better (see: How to Train Your Dragon) how does Pixar define itself?]

All that said, the most significant thing Brave has going for it: Merida is unlike any heretofore Disney princess.  There’s no Prince Charming or any love interest, but even so, this is not an typical modern “Girl Power” movie.  Merida’s journey is thankfully not only about relinquishing patriarchal tradition; it sidesteps that for the most part,  focusing more on a themes about admitting your mistakes and trying to fix them, and trying to understand others when their noblest intentions don’t gel with yours.  What sort of impact this unconventional approach to “a princess story” will have not only to Disney’s merchandising team, but also to girls–and boys–in the audience, remains to be seen.  Maybe Merida’s aversion to finding a man will rub off on some of Disney’s other princesses in interesting ways.

Oh, and La Luna, the short attached to Brave, is seven minutes of pure joy. If Cars 2 had you questioning the supply of creativity left at Pixar, La Luna will temper your doubts while putting a smile on your face. It’s really wonderful.

Final Scores:

Brave: B

…and La Luna: A

Re-Disney: Week 4 Progress Report

Sorry. It was too easy.

It’s been an unexpectedly crazy week at work, which explains the lack of posts.  However, it has (somehow…?) not slowed down my Re-Disney progress. Let’s recap:

Disney Animated Classics:

  1. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  2. Pinocchio
  3. Fantasia
  4. Dumbo
  5. Bambi
  6. Saludos Amigos
  7. The Three Caballeros
  8. Make Mine Music
  9. Fun and Fancy Free
  10. Melody Time
  11. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad
  12. Cinderella
  13. Alice in Wonderland
  14. Peter Pan
  15. Lady and the Tramp
  16. Sleeping Beauty
  17. One Hundred and One Dalmatians
  18. The Sword in the Stone
  19. The Jungle Book
  20. The Aristocats
  21. Robin Hood
  22. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  23. The Rescuers
  24. The Fox and the Hound
  25. The Black Cauldron
  26. The Great Mouse Detective
  27. Oliver & Company
  28. The Little Mermaid
  29. The Rescuers Down Under
  30. Beauty and the Beast
  31. Aladdin
  32. The Lion King
  33. Pocahontas
  34. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  35. Hercules
  36. Mulan
  37. Tarzan
  38. Fantasia 2000
  39. Dinosaur
  40. The Emperor’s New Groove
  41. Atlantis: The Lost Empire
  42. Lilo & Stitch
  43. Treasure Planet
  44. Brother Bear
  45. Home on the Range
  46. Chicken Little
  47. Meet the Robinsons
  48. Bolt
  49. The Princess and the Frog
  50. Tangled
  51. Winnie the Pooh
Pixar:
  1. Toy Story
  2. A Bug’s Life
  3. Toy Story 2
  4. Monsters, Inc.
  5. Finding Nemo
  6. The Incredibles
  7. Cars
  8. Ratatouille
  9. Wall-E
  10. Up
  11. Toy Story 3
  12. Cars 2
  13. Brave

Totals: 56 completed, 8 to go (+14 since last week)

Special thanks to Christie for loaning me Finding Nemo and Cinderella!

Thoughts on this week’s films:

  • Chicken Little isn’t that bad. This is the first time I’d ever seen the film, which I’d previously dismissed as “Disney’s weak attempt to fill the Pixar hole” which was almost created when the companies were at an impasse about a decade ago (and before Disney bought Pixar outright). The worst aspect of the film is that it feels very early-Dreamworks, and not Disney. What I mean by that is that there are a lot of cultural references (like Barbra Streisand…?) which feel shoehorned in here.  Ugh, I hate Shrek for a reason, folks. Still, Chicken Little is cute, if forgettable.
  • Also the first time I’d seen either Saludos Amigos or The Three Caballeros.  I honestly can’t believe Saludos Amigos is even considered a Disney Animated Classic film–it’s less than 45 minutes long, and I’d say at least a third of that isn’t animated.  My understanding is that these two films were thrown together as propaganda pieces for the US Government’s Good Neighbor Program during World War II (basically, Disney was going to win over the South Americans from joining the Axis or something).  Anyway, the video transfers on the combo DVD that came out a few years ago are really terrible, especially on The Three Caballeros.  I’d only recommend watching it for the last, extended sequence in TTC, which is about as trippy a scene as I’ve ever seen Disney produce. And you thought Dumbo‘s pink elephants were something…!  I hope you have some munchies ready.
  • Tangled is awesome and visual treat, and nearly a return to form, except the songs are so dreadfully dull that it sorta ruins the rest of the film.
  • Sometimes the timing of events in Disney movies really throws me.  Okay, so Ariel only has three days to get Prince Eric to kiss her.  Geez, that’s like an eternity compared to Cinderella, who has the prince fall in love with her during, what, one dance without any conversation? Or in Atlantis: The Lost Empire, where the bulk of the story seems to happen within a 24-hour period.  Are these characters just not as cynical about love as I am??
  • Cars 2 and The Black Cauldron really are that bad, both lifeless films obviously put together by committee to try to appeal to demographic X or Y.

Given that, I’m excited for the remainder of my slate (I’ve started watching Pocahontas, and I was really excited…up until Grandmother Willow shows up. UGH!).  Who’s going to see Brave this weekend?  I have my Merida costume all ready for a showing on Sunday!!!!!

Suburban Madness

The I and T in my Meyers-Briggs’ INTJ were firing on all cylinders the other day.

Picture this: it’s 5:00 AM.  I don’t need to set an alarm anymore because Rip’s internal clock tells him it’s time for a walk.  Fine, that’s cool, I’m not, like, mad or anything that the two of us are able to greet the newspaper delivery dude every morning (who, by the by, drives a total creeper van. Beware, kids!).

But, still, it’s 5:00 AM, and there’s only so much an un-caffeinated misanthrope should be expected to tolerate.

I spot my neighbor and her Yorkie from across the parking lot.  She, in her nightgown and me in my University of Michigan gym shorts and a hoodie.

I know this lady’s gonna want to talk; she always does.  But it’s 5:00 AM…and I don’t.  I just want to walk my dog, pick up his poop, and go home to get ready for the day.  With that in mind, I plot the rest of our course around the complex so as to avoid any human interaction whatsoever.  I just don’t care to talk to Yorkie Mom, thankyouverymuch. If it’s not a slumber party, then there’s no justifiable reason for two people in their pajamas to talk to one another.

Whew.  Rounding the last corner toward home, I think I’ve done it.  Success!  No weird small talk with people you don’t know, whose only available topic of conversation always seems to revolve around how big Ripley’s gotten.

Then, as we’re approaching the sidewalk in front of our door, I see her.  Yorkie Mom and Dog are just standing there in front our apartment, waiting for us.

“I’m sorry,” acknowledging she has a problem with petting cute puppies, but just can’t quit.  “I just wanted to see little Rippy!”

!!!

What the what? If you know you’re doing something socially inappropriate…don’t do it!  At this point, the rational part of my brain is blowing up. What a whackadoo! This woman has actually stopped her normal routine and has gone out of her way to wait outside of my house, just to pet my dog…and it’s 5:00 in the morning!

“Yeah, no problem,” I respond, not knowing–and honestly without having enough synapses firing–what to say.

I give her two minutes with the dog, and I may or may not have made any effort to disguise my sheer disgust at her completely innocent love of animals.

What a monster.  5:00 AM!

Re-Disney: Week 3 Progress Report

Disney Animated Classics:

  1. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  2. Pinocchio
  3. Fantasia
  4. Dumbo
  5. Bambi
  6. Saludos Amigos
  7. The Three Caballeros
  8. Make Mine Music
  9. Fun and Fancy Free
  10. Melody Time
  11. The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad
  12. Cinderella
  13. Alice in Wonderland
  14. Peter Pan
  15. Lady and the Tramp
  16. Sleeping Beauty
  17. One Hundred and One Dalmatians
  18. The Sword in the Stone
  19. The Jungle Book
  20. The Aristocats
  21. Robin Hood
  22. The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh
  23. The Rescuers
  24. The Fox and the Hound
  25. The Black Cauldron
  26. The Great Mouse Detective
  27. Oliver & Company
  28. The Little Mermaid
  29. The Rescuers Down Under
  30. Beauty and the Beast
  31. Aladdin
  32. The Lion King
  33. Pocahontas
  34. The Hunchback of Notre Dame
  35. Hercules
  36. Mulan
  37. Tarzan
  38. Fantasia 2000
  39. Dinosaur
  40. The Emperor’s New Groove
  41. Atlantis: The Lost Empire
  42. Lilo & Stitch
  43. Treasure Planet
  44. Brother Bear
  45. Home on the Range
  46. Chicken Little
  47. Meet the Robinsons
  48. Bolt
  49. The Princess and the Frog
  50. Tangled
  51. Winnie the Pooh
Pixar:
  1. Toy Story
  2. A Bug’s Life
  3. Toy Story 2
  4. Monsters, Inc.
  5. Finding Nemo
  6. The Incredibles
  7. Cars
  8. Ratatouille
  9. Wall-E
  10. Up
  11. Toy Story 3
  12. Cars 2
  13. Brave

Totals: 42 completed, 22 to go (+13 since last week)

Yippie! I crossed over the halfway mark earlier this week, somewhere between The Princess and the Frog and Ratatouille.

I think I’ll actually be able to pull this off in the next week and a half, though some films are proving to be more difficult to track down than others. Both Cinderella and Finding Nemo are being re-released on Blu-ray this fall, so I sold off my DVD copies months ago; unfortunately, you can’t rent these on Amazon Instant Video or iTunes. Similarly, I submitted inter-library loan requests for The Three Caballeros, Saludos Amigos, Cars 2 and Winnie the Pooh (2011) weeks ago, but still nothing has materialized. I might have to bite the bullet and just buy those–I can’t go all this way and come up four films short! (Obvious, a human travesty if such a thing were to happen.)

Good slate of films this week.  Re-cap observations time, focusing on some particularly awesome visuals:

  • Not the first time I’ve seen it, but I was reminded that Tarzan is WONDERFUL, right up there with some of the best, early-90s Disney Renaissance stuff, in my opinion. It’s only significant weakness is an underdeveloped villain. I can’t wait for this to come out on Blu-ray–the animation is simply gorgeous. One of the first scenes, as Tarzan “surfs” through the jungle, is really awesome stuff.
  • The animation in Mulan is also beautiful.  Like Pocahontas, though, I felt the film suffers from a serious case of “obligatory animal friend” syndrome.  Crickets, dragons, horses, puppies…yeesh!
  • If you’ve never seen Sleeping Beauty or Lady and the Tramp on Blu-ray, do it. You wouldn’t think that hand-drawn animation would justify a hi-def release, but you’d be wrong. Consider this: you can actually see the shadows between the animated cel and the painted background on these films–you really experience the animation in as true a form as its ever been presented, even in theatres.
  • I understand that Ratatouille is a “good film,” critically and everything, but I just don’t have any particularly strong feelings about it.  I don’t love it, and I think it has to do with the fact that Linguini’s character is pretty obnoxious.  Still, I could watch this film on loop for days on end because it’s just that stunning, and probably the first Pixar movie that I would say that about.  Sure, Toy Story and A Bug’s Life and the earlier films are great stories with groundbreaking animation, but Ratatouille goes out of its way to be beautiful.
  • Can anybody argue that Up is, by far, Pixar’s best overall film (though I think Monsters, Inc. is criminally under-appreciated and is actually Pixar’s most creative work)? That Grape Soda badge gets me every time. Oof.

Alright, folks, we’re nearing the home stretch.  If anybody has a copy of one of the following I could borrow to wrap up this project, let me know!

  • Saludos Amigos
  • The Three Caballeros
  • Cinderella
  • Finding Nemo
  • Cars 2
  • Winnie the Pooh (2011)